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Posted by on Apr 5, 2017 in Tell Me Why |

How Do Medicines Act?

How Do Medicines Act?

Medicines act in a variety of ways. Some can cure an illness by killing or halting the spread of invading germs, such as bacteria and viruses. Others are used to treat cancer by killing cells as they divide or preventing them from multiplying. Some drugs simply replace missing substances or correct abnormally low levels of natural body chemicals such as certain hormones or vitamins. Medicines can even affect parts of the nervous system that control a particular body process.

Nearly everyone has taken an antibiotic. This type of medicine fights bacterial infections. Your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic for things like strep throat or an ear infection. Antibiotics work either by killing bacteria or halting their multiplication so that the body’s immune system can fight off the infection.

Sometimes a part of the body can’t produce enough of a certain chemical. That can also make you sick. Someone with insulin-dependent diabetes, for instance, has a pancreas that can’t produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates glucose in the body). Some people have a low production of thyroid hormone, which helps control how the body uses energy. In each case, doctors can prescribe medicines to replace the missing hormone.

Some medicines treat symptoms but can’t cure the illness that causes the symptoms. (A symptom is anything you feel while you’re sick, such as a cough or nausea.) So taking a lozenge may soothe a sore throat, but it won’t kill that nasty strep bacteria.

Certain medicines are designed to relieve pain. If you pull a muscle, your doctor might tell you to take ibuprofen or acetaminophen. These pain relievers, or analgesics, don’t get rid of the source of the pain — your muscle will still be pulled. What they do is block the pathways that transmit pain signals from the injured or irritated body part to the brain (in other words, they affect the way the brain reads the pain signal) so that you don’t hurt as much while your body recovers.

As people get older, they sometimes develop chronic or long-term conditions. Medicines can help control certain conditions like high blood pressure (hypertension) or high cholesterol. These drugs don’t provide a cure for the underlying problem, but they can help prevent some of the body-damaging effects of the disease or condition over time.

Among the most important medicines are immunizations (or vaccines). These keep people from getting sick in the first place by immunizing, or protecting, the body against certain infectious diseases. Vaccines usually contain a small amount of an agent that resembles a specific germ or germs that have been modified or killed. When someone is vaccinated, it primes the body’s immune system to “remember” the germ so it will be able to fight off infection by that germ in the future.

Most immunizations that prevent you from catching diseases like measles, whooping cough, and chickenpox are given by injection. No one thinks shots are fun. But the diseases they prevent can be very serious and cause symptoms that last much longer than the temporary discomfort of the shot.

Although some medications require a prescription, some are available in stores. For example, many medications for pain, fever, cough, or allergies can be purchased without a prescription. But just because a medicine is available over-the-counter (OTC), that doesn’t mean it’s free of side effects. Take OTC medicines with the same caution as those prescribed by a doctor.

Content for this question contributed by Kevin Kilgore, resident of North Tonawanda, Niagara County, New York, USA