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Posted by on Jun 26, 2015 in Tell Me Why |

Why Do Mosquitoes Bite?

Why Do Mosquitoes Bite?

Only the female mosquito bites. She does so because she needs the blood to develop the eggs inside her body.

When a mosquito “bites,” it drives its pointy snout into your flesh and draws blood up into its belly.

At the same time, it injects saliva into the wound. The saliva mixes with the blood and prevents it from clotting mid-way up the mosquito’s snout.

She can swallow up to four times her weight in blood, and when she is full she looks like a tiny red light bulb.

Most people are allergic to the saliva, which causes the bite to swell and itch. After sipping her blood meal, the mosquito uses the droplet of blood to produce hundreds of mosquito eggs.

Even though mosquito bites aren’t always dangerous, they can be and should be avoided as much as possible.

Mosquitoes are most active during the hours just before and after sunrise and sundown. During these times, be sure to use bug spray and wear long clothing, if appropriate.

Content for this question contributed by Matthew Kirby, resident of Springfield, Massachusetts, USA