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Posted by on Jan 17, 2016 in Tell Me Why |

What Is a Hologram?

What Is a Hologram?

A hologram is a physical structure that diffracts light into an image. The term ‘hologram’ can refer to both the encoded material and the resulting image. A holographic image can be seen by looking into an illuminated holographic print or by shining a laser through a hologram and projecting the image onto a screen.

There are holograms on most driver’s licenses, ID cards and credit cards. If you’re not old enough to drive or use credit, you can still find holograms around your home. They’re part of CD, DVD and software packaging, as well as just about everything sold as “official merchandise.”

Unfortunately, these holograms – which exist to make forgery more difficult – aren’t very impressive. You can see changes in colors and shapes when you move them back and forth, but they usually just look like sparkly pictures or smears of color. Even the mass-produced holograms that feature movie and comic book heroes can look more like green photographs than amazing 3-D images.

On the other hand, large-scale holograms, illuminated with lasers or displayed in a darkened room with carefully directed lighting, are incredible. They’re two-dimensional surfaces that show absolutely precise, three-dimensional images of real objects. You don’t even have to wear special glasses or look through a View-Master to see the images in 3-D.

If you look at these holograms from different angles, you see objects from different perspectives, just like you would if you were looking at a real object. Some holograms even appear to move as you walk past them and look at them from different angles. Others change colors or include views of completely different objects, depending on how you look at them.

Content for this question contributed by Jedi Freeland, resident of Arlington, Gilliam County, Oregon, USA